Sibling in Acylic

This is a chronicle of my first attempt at a realistic portrait in acrylic paint. My little Sister, Sara.

Note:  this was originally posted to backspac.es when I finished the painting in 2014, I'm just trying to gather all the goodness in one place. 

All my underpaintings are done in ocher yellow… It’s what my main painting professor preferred and I think it lends a bright quality to the end result. Since I was working on board, I did a little sketching in pencil as well, trying to get all the bits in the right places.

Sketched directly on the board in Yellow Ocher

Sketched directly on the board in Yellow Ocher

Once the details are sketched in, the real painting begins.

The eyes have it...

The eyes have it...

Base tones for the skin are laid in. I like to start - at least for paler skin tones - by filling in shadows and contours with the same ocher yellow. Because this is acrylic and layers easily, I started with the eyes so I could build up the layers of detail.

At this point it was declared excessively creepy (by SO and housemates) and couldn’t face out on the easel.

Background added and further work on skin tone and shading.

Background added and further work on skin tone and shading.

Realized that it looked creepy because the bridge of the nose was too short... Yay for the ability to mask your mistakes with acrylic! Fixed and moving on!

highlights and shading are starting to come together!

highlights and shading are starting to come together!

Added eyelashes and extras, used a toothbrush to spray on some light freckles. Finally got the lips looking ok. (lips are hard...)

Adding the hair makes a big difference in taking down the creepy factor of this painting...

Adding the hair makes a big difference in taking down the creepy factor of this painting...

Color in the hoodie and starting to add final highlights on the skin and hair.  Final highlights, extra freckles, detail on the hoodie and reflection in the eyes finish it up!

"In Passing", 16x16" Acrylic on Board, 2014

"In Passing", 16x16" Acrylic on Board, 2014

FIN.